Category Archives: Biblical Archaeology

The Dead Sea Scrolls: It’s time for LDS laypeople to stop using these manuscripts as support for Mormonism

By Eric Johnson Check out a February 19, 2018 Viewpoint on Mormonism podcast series dealing with this topic by going to Part 1  Part 2   Part 3   Part 4  Part 5   Mention the Dead Sea Scrolls to a Mormon and a Christian alike and it is likely both will have at least some familiarity with the topic. The first […]

10 Favorite twentieth century biblical archaeological discoveries in Israel

By Eric Johnson All photos were taken by the author during one of his nine trips to the Holy Land. The Dead Sea Scrolls. The Dead Sea Scrolls is, in many scholars’ opinions, the most important biblical archaeological discovery of the 20th century. Copies of ancient documents were discovered in eleven caves along the northwestern shore of the […]

The Dead Sea Scrolls Q&A

An exhibit containing 10 fragments along with other artifacts from the Dead Sea Scrolls will be coming to the Leonardo (www.leonardo.org) in Salt Lake City, UT beginning Nov. 22, 2013 and staying until April 2014. We encourage every Christian believer to see this exhibit. Bill and Eric will be discussing these scrolls on their Viewpoint on Mormonism show from Tuesday, 11/19 through Friday, 11/22. Here are some quick questions and answers to help familiarize yourself with this topic.

Archaeology and the Bible

By Eric Johnson

Archaeology, or the scientific study of historic peoples and their cultures, is certainly a fascinating topic. Biblical archaeologists, as they were once called before the 1970s, have been able to locate many sites and artifacts in the Holy Land to help show how the cities and people listed in the Bible were authentic. For instance, New Testament discoveries include Herod’s temple (Jerusalem, Luke 1:9), the Pool of Siloam (Jerusalem, John 9:7), Pilate’s inscription (Caesarea, Luke 3:1), Erastus’ inscription (Corinth, Romans 16:23), the tomb of Augustus (Rome, Luke 2:1), Mamertime Prison (Rome, 2 Timothy 1:16-17), and the Arch of Titus (Rome, Luke 19:43-44).