Tag Archives: paid ministry

The Real Threat of Mormonism

By Sharon Lindbloom 14 October 2016 Over the years I have encountered many misperceptions that Mormons have about Christians and Christianity. One of note is found in a little book published in 1998 by LDS author Scott Marshall. In an effort to explain the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, Mr. Marshall wrote, “THE TRINITY CREATION. […]

Paid Ministry

Paid Ministry. The criticism Mormons have toward any local religious leader or pastor to receive a salary for their labors. According to Apostle Franklin Richards, “One of the important and distinguishing features of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is that its affairs are administered by the lay members of the Church rather than by paid clergy. (Conference Reports, October 1968, p. 113). The motives of those who are paid are even questioned.

What does "unpaid ministry" look like?

One of the criticisms many Mormons have about Evangelical Christian churches is their perception of a “paid” clergy. However, Bible and even the D&C are very specific that leaders, such as bishops, ought to be paid. However, an LDS Mission President’s Handbook was released on the Internet by a private individual. In this current handbook, it explains the many perks that the mission president’s family receives, including all living expenses, college tuition, and even a maid and gardener. For a mission president in Utah, the benefits could easily reach $100,000. Yet the mission president pays no taxes on these benefits and is not even required to tithe. What’s going on here? This article examines the situation and does away with the notion that Mormon leaders are not “paid.”

Mormonism’s Paid Ministry

I can’t begin to number all of the times the argument of a “paid ministry” has been used by the zealous Latter-day Saint to “prove” his church as true. Many feel that a compensated ministry is proof that an apostasy exists among many of the Bible-believing denominations. It seems that, while many Latter-day Saints believe their leaders put in a full day’s work for their church, few can explain how they can do this without being compensated for their time. The only logical way that this can be accomplished is if each and every general authority in the LDS Church is financially independent. This, of course, is not the case.