Examining the "17 Points of the True Church"

Examining the "17 Points of the True Church" 

By Bill McKeever

Faith-promoting tales allegedly proving the authenticity of the Mormon Church have made the rounds among Latter-day Saints for years. As one story goes, around the beginning of the second world war, a group of college students were discussing what they felt "the Lord's true church" should be like. A list of seventeen points was drawn up and each set out to find which of the all the churches could meet the requirements on the list. Years later the five men met again and were amazed to discover that all five had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as it alone met every requirement. Today this list is found on several LDS websites.

Another case of Mormon folklore or extreme exaggeration? Perhaps. However, does this list really support the claim that the LDS Church is the only true church on earth? Let us briefly examine each point.

1. Christ Organized the Church.

This argument is purely subjective as most organizations claiming to be Christian feel Christ organized their church. This would include the Watchtower Society (Jehovah's Witnesses) and others that deny sound biblical doctrine. People make the Church. Because Christ's Church is made up of many individuals who have trusted in Christ totally for their salvation, it would be erroneous to view any particular building, organization, or denomination as the "true church."

2. The true church must bear the name of Christ.

If Mormons wish to use this argument, they must answer as to why their own church was called merely "The Church of the Latter-day Saints" from 1834-1838. By their reasoning their own church must have been in apostasy for at least four years. Those who belonged to the early Christian church were known more by their geographic location rather than an "organizational" name. In I Thessalonians 1:1 Paul addresses "The church of the Thessalonians." Are we to assume that Paul was addressing a false church?

3. The true church must have a foundation of Apostles and Prophets.

The true church has as its foundation Jesus Christ. He is the Chief cornerstone and/or foundation. I Corinthians 3:11 reads, "For other foundation can no man lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ." Deuteronomy 18:15 makes it clear that Jesus Christ Himself is "the Prophet" who guides His Church today. (See also John 5:46; 6:14; 7:40; Acts 3:22-23.)

4. The true church must have the same organization as Christ's church.

If the LDS Church follows Eph 4:11-14, why is the order of authority reversed? Paul says first in line come the apostles, next the prophets. Mormonism reverses this order. If Mormonism emulates the structure of the early church, where in the Bible is there any mention of multiple high priests, Relief Society presidents, Second Quorum of the Seventies, stake presidencies, ward bishoprics, etc.? Where are the Mormon's pastors, and evangelists?

5. The true church must claim divine authority.

Again, this is purely subjective. Any organization can claim to be authoritative. Bible-believing Christians claim the authority of God's Word, the Bible, not the words of mere men who contradict it.

6. The true church must have no paid ministry.

Mormons who believe their leaders are not paid are very misinformed. All the General Authorities in Salt Lake City receive remuneration for their services to the church and from the church. If they don't believe it, they should call the LDS Church headquarters and ask. A paid ministry is not unbiblical. The entire Old Testament speaks of a paid ministry as well as I Corinthians chapter 9.

7. The true church must baptize by immersion.

If baptism (a work) was necessary in order for a person to be saved, this could be a debatable subject. However, Ephesians 2:8,9 clearly states that we are saved by grace through faith, not works such as baptism. Baptism is merely an outside sign of an inner work of the Holy Spirit in an individual's life. Believers should be baptized as a testimony of their faith in Christ; however, baptism does not save.

8. The true church must bestow the gift of the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands.

Many Christian churches do practice this. The Bible shows, however, that at times the Holy Ghost (Spirit) was received of men without mention of hands being laid on them. (See Acts 4:31; 10:44; 11:15.)

9. The true church must practice divine healing.

Again, many Christian churches do practice this and do get results.

10. The true church must teach that God and Jesus Christ are separate and distinct individuals.

The Christian church holds that Jesus Christ and God the Father are separate personages. Joseph Smith strayed from the truth when he said they were separate Gods. This conflicts with many passages such as Deut. 6:4 and Isaiah 43:10, just to name a few.

11. The true church must teach that God and Jesus Christ have bodies of flesh and bone.

Mormons believe this only to substantiate Joseph Smith's so-called first vision. John 4:24 claims God is a spirit (lit. God is Spirit). Even Smith at one time taught God the Father was a personage of spirit (See Lectures on Faith, Lecture Fifth). He changed his mind later on.

12. The officers must be called of God.

Another subjective point. All cultists believe they are called of God.

13. The true church must claim revelation from God.

Again, a subjective point. All cultists claim revelation from God.

14. The true church must be a missionary church.

Any Christian church that wants to see souls saved is a missionary church whether that mission field is across the ocean or across the back fence. The Mormon church holds no exclusive rights to missionary activity.

15. The true church must be a restored church.

You can't restore something that wasn't lost. Jesus Himself said the gates of hell would not prevail against His church (Matthew 16:18). History proves this.

16. The true church must practice baptism for the dead.

The Christian church never condoned baptism for the dead. Paul excludes himself from such a practice when he uses a third person pronoun rather than first person ("Why do they baptize for the dead ...") (See Hebrews 9:27 and Alma 34:34,35 for that matter.)

17. By their fruits ye shall know them.

This expression is taken from Matthew 7:20, which ironically deals with judging false prophets, not churches. In examining the fruits of Joseph Smith, we find that he indeed was a false prophet. He introduced a foreign view of God, a false plan of salvation, and inaccurate predictions about future events. If we must use this verse to examine the fruits of Mormonism, we must have an answer as to why the Mormon Church must constantly reverse its position on matters that should never change (Alma 41:8). Why do their leaders contradict past leaders? Why did they change the Book of Mormon so many times when it was supposedly translated "by the gift and power of God the first time"? Why did they change their temple ceremony in 1990 when Smith claimed it came by direct revelation? And doesn't it seem suspicious that many of the changes in the ceremony were things Christians (and Mormons) had been criticizing for years? Did God mess up or did Joseph Smith (or was it their current leaders)? 

For a 3-part podcast on this topic, go to:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3