1 Peter 4:6

Joseph Smith claimed his vision also gave him understanding of 1 Peter
4:6, another ambiguous passage. It says in part, “For this cause was the gospel
preached also to them that are dead.” The New International Version
translates the last portion of this, “the gospel was preached even to those
who are now dead.” While the word now is not found in the original Greek,
it was used by the translators because the context suggests that the preaching
of the gospel had been delivered in the past to those who were now deceased.
In order to support the Mormon view of a second chance to hear the gospel
message and receive salvation after death, the first verb would need to be
present tense (i.e., “for this cause is the gospel preached also to them that
are dead”). It is not, which is a clear blow to the Mormon interpretation. To
suggest that living people can become “saviors” of those already dead is not a
Christian teaching and must therefore be rejected.23

Joseph Smith claimed he had understanding of 1 Peter 4:6, which says in part, “For this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead.” The New International Version translates the last portion of this, “the gospel was preached even to those who are now dead.” While the word now is not found in the original Greek, it was used by the translators because the context suggests that the preaching of the gospel had been delivered in the past to those who were now deceased. In order to support the Mormon view of a second chance to hear the gospel message and receive salvation after death, the first verb would need to be present tense (i.e., “for this cause is the gospel preached also to them that are dead”). Peter said in the context (verse 5) that those who were living evil lives and causing problems for these first century Christians were going to be judged. He then moved back into the past tense, explaining that those who were already dead had the truth preached to them when they were alive. While Peter explained in the previous chapter (3:19) how Jesus “made a proclamation to the spirits in prison,” there is no indication that this meant these spirits could accept the gospel.  To say that salvation can take place after death goes against the Bible’s teaching, as Heb 9:27 and 2 Cor 6:2 state that there are no second chances.