Masonry and the Mormon Temple Endowment Ceremony

by Sharon Lindbloom 18 February 2019 Earlier this month The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints posted a new essay to the Church History Topics section of its website. In the church’s continuing effort to be more “transparent” about its past, the new essay, titled “Masonry,” examines the relationship between the LDS temple endowment … Read more

Chapter 23: “The Blessings of the Holy Temple”

During 2017, LDS members will be studying the latest manual published by their church, Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Gordon B. Hinckley. We will evaluate this book regularly, chapter by chapter, by showing interesting quotes and providing an Evangelical Christian take on this manual. The quotes from Hinckley are in bold, with my comments … Read more

Chapter 13: The Temple—The Great Symbol of Our Membership

During 2016, LDS members will be studying the latest manual published by their church, Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Howard W. Hunter We will evaluate this book regularly, chapter by chapter, by showing interesting quotes and providing an Evangelical Christian take on this manual. The text that is in boldfaced is from the manual, … Read more

Chapter 13: Priceless Blessings of the House of the Lord

Chapter 13: Priceless Blessings of the House of the Lord Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Ezra Taft Benson, (2014), 167–78 During 2015, LDS members will be studying the latest manual published by their church, Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Ezra Taft Benson. We will evaluate this book regularly, chapter by chapter, by showing … Read more

Preparando para Su Visita al Templo

By Bill McKeever  Los líderes de la Iglesia de Jesucristo de los Santos de los Últimos Días (los Mormones) enfatizan la importancia del trabajo del templo. El significado de estos edificios en la teología Mormona es algo que hay que subrayar. De hecho, el Mormón fiel solo puede esperar lograr la exaltación o la deidad si … Read more

Preparing to Enter the Holy Temple

In 2002, the LDS Church produced a booklet titled Preparing to Enter the Holy Temple. It was written for those who are preparing to go through one of the dozens of Mormons temples located around the world (141 at the time of this writing). What is the LDS leadership telling its people about temples? Does what takes place in the LDS temples line up with biblical teaching? And do truth-seeking people need such things as temple ordinances, sealings, and baptisms for the dead?  Let’s consider these questions as we review this publication.

Chapter 10: “Come into the Temples”

The temple is centerpiece in Mormonism. Without these more than 140 edifices throughout the world, there would be no ability for the living to do the work necessary for them and the dead to attain celestial glory. While Mormons get very excited about their temples, we must ask if the temple practices of the LDS Church are biblical. If they are, then Christians everywhere should join this religious movement so they can enter one of these edifices and do the required work. If they are not, then Mormon temple worship today is unnecessary and even spiritually harmful.

Chapter 20: Temporal Salvation for Ourselves and Others

The storing of food and supplies to last one year is something that Latter-day Saints are encouraged to do by their church leaders. In Utah, many families even purchase food storage racks so they can rotate their stock. When Smith says that not obeying the Word of Wisdom is “setting aside the plain teachings of the Lord with reference to our lives,” he provides no scriptural support. Of course, it makes common sense that people should prepare for disasters, such as earthquakes, tornados, or hurricanes. But nowhere does the Bible (or other LDS Standard Works, for that matter) suggest that a family should keep enough supplies and food for a year. This is a unique 20th century LDS command.

Teachings of Presidents of the Church: George Albert Smith Chapter 8

Unlike temples from biblical times, LDS temples are used by worthy living members to perform proxy baptisms for the dead as well as participate in the endowment and perform sealings for time and eternity. Vicarious baptisms on behalf of those who are deceased comprise a great majority of the activity behind temple doors. The endowment involves ceremonies where the members learn about the plan of salvation while making covenants (promises) that, Apostle Russell M. Nelson said, “will qualify you and your family for the blessings of eternal life.” (“Face the Future with Faith,”Ensign, May 2011, 36.). He also said, “The possibility of eternal life—even exaltation—is available to us through our obedience to covenants made and ordinances received in holy temples of God.” (“Prepare for the Blessings of the Temple,” Temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints(supplement to the Ensign magazine), October 2010, 50).

They See Dead People?

By Bill McKeever

Listen

Human communication with the dead, or necromancy, is never encouraged in the Bible and is always condemned (1 Samuel 15:23, 28:6ff). Such a practice was punishable by death (1 Samuel 28:9) in theocratic Israel. Despite these grave warnings, many temple Mormons look forward with great anticipation to possibly being visited by spirits of the dead. In fact, there are a number of recorded sightings of alleged dead spirits who have visited Mormons in LDS temples.

Prior to the dedication of the San Diego temple in 1993, local Mormon families were given a packet entitled Family Temple Preparation Material. Included in this written material were about seven pages devoted to “true stories” of temple patrons who were visited by the dead.

 

The Sin of Jeroboam

 By Bill McKeever

Following the death of King Solomon, the nation of Israel went through a brief power struggle that tore the country in two. When Solomon’s son Rehoboam listened to bad counsel and promised to rule with a heavy hand, ten of the tribes rebelled under the leadership of Jeroboam. The remaining two tribes (Judah and Benjamin) formed what is known as the Southern Kingdom.

Masonic Influence in the Endowment Ceremony

By Bill McKeever

Although Doctrine and Covenants 124:41 says that the LDS temple ordinances were “kept hid from before the foundations of the earth,” they are suspiciously close to those used in Freemasonry. Signs, grips, oaths, and tokens used in Mormonism are so similar that one can’t escape the suspicion Smith “borrowed” these Masonic practices, especially since he became a Mason on March 15, 1842 (Documentary History of the Church 4:550-551).

Preparing for Your Temple Tour

By Bill McKeever

Leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons) emphasize the importance of temple work. The significance of these buildings in Mormon theology cannot be overstressed. In fact, it is only by participating in the temple ritual that a faithful Mormon hopes to achieve exaltation or godhood.