Apostles

Apostles in Alphabetical Order (alphabetical by last name)

  • Ballard, Melvin J. (1873-1939) Salt Lake City Cemetery (2oo N ST.): Became an apostle in 1919.
  • Benson, Ezra T. (1811-1869): Logan (UT) City Cemetery (1000 N. 1200 W.): He had 8 wives and 35 children, probably better known for being the great-great grandfather of 13th president Ezra Taft Benson.
  • Cannon, George Q. (1827-1901): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Member of the First Presidency under four different apostles.
  • Clark, J. Reuben, Jr. (1871-1961): Salt Lake City Cemetery: A government attorney, Clark became an apostle in 1934 and served in the First Presidency for 28 years, longer than anyone besides a church president.
  • Clawson, Rudger (1857-1943):  Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1901 and served as a member of the First Presidency for 22 years, the second longest tenure in LDS history.
  • Cowdery, Oliver (1808-1850): Pioneer Cemetery (Richmond, VA): Was part of the church in its formative period between 1829 and 1836, received both the Aaronic and Melchizidek priesthoods with Joseph Smith, and was one of the first apostles. Excommunicated in 1838, Cowdery later became a Methodist before eventually returning to the LDS Church.
  • Evans, Richard L. (1906-1971) Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1953. He was the last general authority to wear facial hair, keeping a neatly trimmed mustache until the mid-1960s.
  • Grant, Jedediah M. (1816-1856): Salt Lake City Cemetery: A Seventy from 1845 to 1854 who later served in the First Presidency under second President Brigham Young from 1854 to 1856. Known for fiery sermons during the “Reformation” of 1856. he was the father of Heber J. Grant, who became the church’s  seventh president.
  • Hinckley, Alonzo A. (1870-1936): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Uncle of future LDS president Gordon B. Hinckley, Alonzo became an apostle in 1934.
  • Hyde, Orson (1805-1878): Spring City (UT) Pioneer Cemetery: An original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, serving as the president from 1847-1875. Marker and back.
  • Ivins, Anthony W. (1852-1934): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1907 and became a member of the First Presidency in 1921. Cousin of Heber J. Grant.
  • Kimball, Heber C.  (1801-1868) and back: Kimball-Whitney Cemetery (Salt Lake City, UT): One of the original 12 LDS Church apostles and a member of the First Presidency to Brigham Young beginning in 1847.
  • Lund, Anthony H. (1844-1921): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1889 and then served as a member of the First Presidency from 1901. From 1918 until his death, he was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.
  • Lyman, Amasa (1813-1877): Fillmore (UT)) Cemetery (350 E. 600 S.): Appointed an apostle by Brigham Young in 1860. In 1862, he gave a sermon that indicated the atonement of Jesus was not necessary. The sermon came to light in 1867 and he was stripped of his apostleship before he was excommunicated in 1870. Although he was never readmitted into the church, he was reinstated after his death by LDS President Joseph F. Smith in 1909. Lyman married eight women, including Joseph Smith’s polygamous widow Eliza Maria Partridge, and altogether he fathered 38 children. His great-great-grandson was James E. Faust. who served as an apostle for 29 years. Original.
  • Marsh, Thomas B. (1799-1866): Ogden (UT) Cemetery (1875 Monroe Bl.): An original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, served in the First Presidency from 1835-1839. He was excommunicated in 1839, left the church for 18 years, and was later rebaptzsed in 1857, never holding a church position again.
  • Maxwell, Neal A. (1926-2004) Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1981.
  • McConkie, Bruce R. (1915-1985), Salt Lake City Cemetery: Apostle who wrote the book Mormon Doctrine and was considered the top LDS theologian of his day.
  • Moyle, Henry D. (1889-1963): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1947 and later became a member of the First Presidency in 1959.
  • Packer, Boyd K. (1924-2015): Brigham City (UT) Cemetery (300 E. 300 S.): Became an assistant to the Twelve in 1961 (position in church no longer exists) before becoming an apostle in 1970. He was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve from 2008 until his death. (Photo here was taken two months after his death before the official marker/stone had been made.)
  • Petersen, Mark E. (1900-1984): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Worked as a president/chairman of the board with the Deseret News and became an apostle in 1944.
  • Penrose, Charles W. (1832-1925): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1904 and then became a member of the First Presidency in 1911. With wives.
  • Phelps, W.W. (1792-1872): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Scribe to Joseph Smith and publisher of the Evening and Morning Star newspaper. Author of eleven LDS hymns and publisher of the Book of Commandments. Excommunicated from the church in 1839 for bearing witness against Joseph Smith. Pleaded for forgiveness in 1840 and was rebaptized, later becoming a member of the Council of Fifty. Back
  • Pratt, Orson and close-up of marker (1811-1881): Salt Lake City Cemetery: One of the original 12 LDS Church apostles and one of the deepest thinkers the LDS Church has ever had. Sarah Pratt (wife) and wives.
  • Richards, Franklin D. (1821-1899): Ogden (UT)  Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1849. Related to Willard Richards, an earlier apostle; Franklin’s son George F. and grandson LeGrand also later served as apostles.
  • Richards, George F. (1861-1950): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1906 and the President of the Quorum of the Twelve in 1945.
  • Richards, LeGrand (1886-1983): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1952. May be best known for his 1950 book A Marvelous Work and a Wonder.
  • Richards, Willard (1804-1854): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle under Brigham Young in 1840 and was in the Carthage Jail where Joseph and Hyrum Smith were shot dead. Became a member of the First Presidency in 1847 and, after coming to Utah in 1847, later became the first editor-in-chief of the Deseret News.
  • Snow, Erastus (1818-1888):  Salt Lake City Cemetery: Appointed an apostle in 1849, Snow was a leader in LDS colonization in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico.
  • Talmage, James E. (1862-1933):  Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1911. Commissioned by the First Presidency to write Articles of Faith and Jesus the Christ.
  • Thatcher, Moses (1842-1909): Logan Cemetery (1000 N. 1200 E.):  Became an apostle in 1879. Dropped from the Quorum of the Twelve in 1896 because he refused to sign a policy called “The Political Rule of the Church,” which was known as the “political Manifesto.” He was not excommunicated and remained supportive of the church until his death.
  • Wells, Daniel H. (1814-1891): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Served as Lieutenant General of the Nauvoo Legion after Joseph Smith was killed, even though he was not a Mormon. Baptized in 1846 and migrated to Salt Lake Valley in 1848. Ordained an apostle and became a member of the First Presidency under Brigham Young in 1856, though he was never sustained as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostle. When Young died in 1877, Wells became a “Counselor to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles,” a position he held until death.From 1888 to 1891, he was the first president of the Manti Temple. He had eight wives and forty children. Memorial and marker.
  • Widtsoe, John A. (1872-1952): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1921. A noted scholar, author, and scientist.
  • Whitney, Orson F. (1855-1931): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Became an apostle in 1906. Parents were Horace Whitney and Helen Mar Kimball Whitney, originally a polygamous wife of Joseph Smith.
  • Wirthlin, Joseph B. (1917-2008) and marker: Salt Lake City Cemetery. Became an apostle in 1986.
  • Young, Brigham Young, Jr. (1836-1903): Salt Lake City Cemetery: Son of the second president, became an apostle in 1864.

To see gravesites of Presidents of the LDS Church, click here.

To see other gravesites of important members of the LDS Church, click here.